Milan Dental Associates

Dentist - Milan

519 W. Main Street , Milan, MI 48160

(734) 439-1543
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Milan, MI 48160

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Posts for: May, 2014

By Milan Dental Associates
May 27, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   toothpaste  
WhatsInYourToothpaste

What do burnt eggshells, crushed bones, brick dust and ox-hoof ashes have in common? Are they things you discovered in your kid's pocket? Ingredients in a witches brew? Funky organic compost materials?

It may be hard to believe — but they're all substances that were once used to make toothpaste, from ancient Egyptian concoctions through 18th century British blends. But don't worry: You won't find any broken crockery or ashes inside a modern tube! Today's toothpastes are scientifically formulated to be effective in removing plaque, which helps prevent tooth decay and gum disease (not to mention bad breath.) So what makes them work so well?

One class of ingredients found in all toothpastes is abrasives — also called cleaning and polishing agents. These slightly grainy substances make the mechanical action of brushing more effective. But unlike crushed bones, or the harsh, gritty particles of yore, today's abrasives are designed to remove stains and bacterial films without damaging tooth structure.

Next come detergents, which account for the foam you see when you brush vigorously. Detergents (sometimes called “surfactants”) help to break up and wash away materials that would otherwise be difficult to dissolve. An ingredient called sodium lauryl sulfate, which is also found in many shampoos, is probably the most common detergent used in toothpastes.

Fluoride, first included in toothpaste in 1914, is another common ingredient. In fact, all toothpastes that carry the seal of the American Dental Association contain it, typically in the form of sodium fluoride, stannous fluoride or sodium monofluorophosphate. It has been proven to make tooth enamel stronger and more resistant to decay.

In addition to these primary components, toothpastes generally contain flavorings to make them more palatable, and binders and preservatives to hold them together and keep them from drying out. Special-purpose toothpastes — like those designed to whiten teeth, prevent tartar, or help reduce sensitivity — have added ingredients.

But regardless of what's in your toothpaste, there's one thing you should remember: It's not the paste (or the brush) that keeps your teeth and gums healthy — it's the hand that holds it! Brushing once or twice a day, using a soft brush with the proper technique (and your favorite toothpaste!) is probably the most important thing you can do at home to enhance your overall oral health.

If you have questions about toothpastes or oral hygiene, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine article “Toothpaste — What's In It?


WhatMadeAmericanIdolFinalistElliottYaminSmile

One day, while looking at old pictures of himself, 34-year-old American Idol finalist Elliott Yamin noticed something peculiar. “I [had] figured out how to kind of smile without displaying all my teeth,” he told an interviewer with People magazine. The reason: Yamin (like many other people) was unhappy with the way his teeth looked. And others noticed it too: “[They] wrote things in magazines, called me Snaggletooth and things like that,” he said.

Yamin's situation came to the attention of dentists from across the country, several of whom offered to fix his crossbite and other problems. One of them even provided the singer with computer-generated renderings of how he'd look after a total “smile makeover” — and that was enough to convince him. Finally, after receiving a set of porcelain veneers and other dental work — all provided free of charge by the concerned dentist — Yamin has the smile he always dreamed of.

You don't have to be an American Idol finalist to appreciate the benefit of having a super smile — and it's never too late to get started! As Yamin found out, a “smile analysis” is the first step, and it's a critical part of the process. This is the time when you and your dentist get to know each other, and begin talking about what kind of a look you want to achieve, and what you should realistically expect.

But it can be tough to express in words exactly what your idea of a perfect smile looks like. Are the teeth completely regular in alignment and “Hollywood white?” A little bit asymmetrical and more natural-looking — or something in between? And exactly how would that look on you? Fortunately, we have a variety of ways to help you make those decisions.

One is computer-generated images, like the ones that persuaded Yamin. Convenient and relatively easy to produce, they're a great way to preview possible changes before a single tooth is touched. However, some people may find it hard to picture their new smile from different angles and in different lights. If you'd like a better representation, it's possible to produce a 3-D model of the proposed work before it's done. This can let you truly visualize your new smile in a realistic way.

If you need even more evidence before deciding, there's still more that can be done. Your teeth can be built up to their new contours with composite resin, a tooth-colored restoration material that can change tooth shape and size with relative ease. A related procedure, the “provisional restoration,” gives you a complete preview of the final work. When you're satisfied, the “temporary” materials are replaced with more permanent ones, like long-lasting porcelain veneers. Whichever method you choose, you'll be on your way to a better looking smile.

If you would like more information about a smile makeover, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Great Expectations — Perceptions in Smile Design” and “Smile Design Enhanced with Porcelain Veneers.”


By Milan Dental Associates
May 02, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: gum disease   loose teeth  
TreatingLooseTeethandtheUnderlyingCauses

Adult teeth aren’t meant to be loose — it’s a sign that something is wrong. And while there are treatments, time is of the essence before permanent tooth or bone loss occurs.

Loose teeth can occur for many different reasons. Bite-related problems are fairly common, referred to as occlusal trauma (“occlusal” – bite; “trauma” – injury). This could be the result of excessive force placed on otherwise normal teeth and jaws — chronic clenching or grinding habits, for example. On the other hand, even normal biting or chewing can cause teeth to loosen if bone loss from gum disease has become excessive, reducing the remaining attachment to bone to inadequate levels. In some cases it can be a result of both excessive force and weakened bone levels.

Of these reasons, the most common cause is the weakened attachment of the teeth to the bone due to gum disease. If this is the case, it’s important first to treat the gum disease by an appropriate strategy for the disease present and then implement an effective dental hygiene program to inhibit reoccurrence.

As for the problem of loose teeth, there are measures to address it. Occlusal bite adjustment reduces the degree of force when biting or chewing by reshaping the biting surfaces through selective grinding. Splinting is another technique in which the teeth are joined together to make them more rigid and to redistribute the biting force among several teeth. This can be done with material bonded across the outside of several teeth or with a metal splint affixed within a pre-cut channel across the teeth. A more permanent option is to create a series of crowns to affix to the teeth and then fuse them together.

Although more complex, orthodontics to correct misaligned teeth is another option. Not only will it improve the bite and potentially reduce bite forces, it may also improve the health of the supporting periodontal attachment.

Before undertaking any treatment, you should first undergo a thorough exam to determine the true cause of your loose teeth and any underlying conditions. From there we can recommend the best approach for treating and preserving your teeth.

If you would like more information on treatments for loose teeth, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Treatment for Loose Teeth.”